2023 Tournament of Champions: How to watch, who’s playing in the LPGA’s season opener – On Her Turf | NBC Sports

The LPGA kicks off its 74th season this week in Orlando, Florida, where world No. 16 Danielle Kang looks to defend her 2022 title at the Hilton Grand Vacations Tournament of Champions at Lake Nona Golf & Country Club. The field features 29 tournament winners from the past two seasons along with 53 celebrity players, who will tee it up in a one-of-a-kind event beginning Thursday. The event format features 72 holes of stroke play for the professionals and a 72-hole Modified Stableford format for the celebrities.

The Tournament of Champions is the first of 33 events for the 2023 LPGA season, which boasts a record-setting prize purse of $104.5 million. Prize money for the TOC is $1.5 million (matching the smallest on the LPGA schedule), with $225,000 going to the champion. The celebrity and amateur purse is $500,000, with the winner taking home $100,000.


How to watch the Hilton Grand Vacations Tournament of Champions

The Tournament of Champions is the first of 33 events for the 2023 LPGA season, which boasts a record-setting prize purse of $104.5 million. Prize money for the TOC is $1.5 million (matching the smallest on the LPGA schedule), with $225,000 going to the champion. The celebrity and amateur purse is $500,000, with the winner taking home $100,000.
You can watch the 2023 Hilton Grand Vacations Tournament of Champions on Golf Channel, Peacock, NBC, NBCSports.com and the NBC Sports app. Here’s the complete TV and streaming schedule:
The 2023 Tournament of Champions field is headlined by world No. 2 Nelly Korda, who recently announced new sponsorship deals with Nike and TaylorMade, last year’s runner-up No. 7 Brooke Henderson and newly-minted Hilton Grand Vacations brand ambassador No. 10 Nasa Hataoka. Celebrities include Hall of Famer Annika Sorenstam, “Today” show co-host Dylan Dreyer, and former Red Sox star Derek Lowe, who edged out Sorenstam on the first playoff hole to win last year’s celebrity/amateur portion of the event.
Also in the field are a slew of first-time LPGA winners from last year, who will make their Tournament of Champions debut, including:
Among the notable absences this week are world No. 1 Lydia Ko, who is still on her honeymoon following her Dec. 30 wedding, and 2022 major winners Minjee Lee (U.S. Women’s Open) and In Gee Chun (KPMG Women’s PGA Championship). Last year’s Louise Suggs Rookie of the Year, No. 4 Atthaya Thitifkul, and No. 9 Hyo Joo Kim did not enter the event, while No. 6 Lexi Thompson didn’t qualify, as her last LPGA win came in 2019.
The LPGA professionals will compete in a 72-hole, stroke-play event with no cut, while the celebrities and amateurs will use the Modified Stableford scoring system. The player with the most points at the conclusion of the tournament will crowned champion. A quick refresher on the Modified Stableford format:
After losing to Jessica Korda in a playoff at the 2021 TOC, Danielle Kang exacted a bit of revenge at Lake Nona in 2022. She fired the low round of the day in Sunday’s final round — a 4-under 68 — to win by three shots over Brooke Henderson. Kang was the only player in the field to card four rounds in the 60s, and finished at 16-under 272 to secure her sixth career LPGA title.
She played just 18 events last year, sitting out most of the summer after revealing last June that she had a tumor on her spine. The now 30-year-old returned to competition in late August and notched three top 10s over seven starts to end the season, including a solo second at the Walmart NW Arkansas Championship and a T-3 at the LPGA MEDIHEAL Championship.
Lake Nona Golf & Country Club, located in Orlando, Florida, was designed by Tom Fazio and opened in 1986. The par-72 layout stretches to 6,617 yards and notably was the site of the inaugural Solheim Cup in 1990, when the United States defeated Europe 11½ to 4½. The classic Fazio creation — his first solo design — features four par 5s and four par 3s and is home to 16 LPGA and Ladies’ European Tour players.
The NBC Sports’ golf research team contributed to this report. 
The U.S. Women’s National team faces New Zealand, the co-host nation of the 2023 Women’s World Cup, in a two-game series tonight and this Friday, January 20 in Spanish on Universo and Peacock. Live coverage begins at 10:05 p.m. ET. Streaming will also be available via the Telemundo app. See below for additional information on how to watch and live stream all of the USWNT vs New Zealand action in Spanish as part of a new four-year partnership that makes Telemundo and Peacock the home of the USMNT and USWNT in the leadup to the 2023 and 2026 World Cups.
RELATED: 2023 Women’s World Cup – Storylines to watch as USWNT prepares to take aim at historic three-peat
Tonight’s USWNT vs New Zealand match up will be one of many exciting games featured in Spanish on Telemundo, Universo, and Peacock as a part of Telemundo Enterprises and the U.S. Soccer Federation’s multiyear media rights agreement announced earlier this week. The deal will include and culminate with coverage of special events and content opportunities during Send-Off matches and leading up to, during and following the 2023 FIFA Women’s World Cup, the 2024 Olympic Games in Paris, and the 2026 FIFA Men’s World Cup taking place in Canada, Mexico and the United States.
On the road to the 2023 World Cup, the USWNT will also partake in the SheBelieves Cup taking place February 16 through February 22 at Exploria Stadium in Orlando, Florida, GEODIS Park in Nashville, Tennessee, and Toyota Stadium in Frisco, Texas.
RELATED: 2023 wish list – Top women’s sports storylines to follow in the new year
The upcoming edition of the Women’s World Cup is set to run from July 20th to August 20th with matches taking place in Australia and New Zealand. Telemundo will be the exclusive Spanish-language home of the tournament, with streaming also available on Peacock.
RELATED: When and where is the 2026 World Cup?
Sign up for a Peacock Premium plan to start watching. With Peacock Premium, you can watch all our live sports like Premier League, Sunday Night Football, and cycling; next-day airings from channels like NBC, USA Network, and Telemundo; plus all the movies and TV you want on Peacock.
If you want to watch everything ad-free,* choose our $9.99/month Peacock Premium Plus plan.
*Please note: due to streaming rights, a small amount of programming will still contain ads (Peacock channels, events, and a limited number of shows and movies).
You can change or cancel your paid plan anytime.
RELATED: NBCUniversal Telemundo Enterprises and U.S. Soccer Federation Announce Multiyear Media Rights Agreement 
You can enjoy Peacock on a variety of devices. View the full list of supported devices here.
Maya Moore has officially decided to retire from playing basketball.
The Minnesota Lynx great stepped away from the WNBA in 2019 to help her now-husband Jonathan Irons win his release from jail by getting his 50-year sentence overturned in 2020. After gaining his release, Irons married Moore soon after and the couple had their first child, Jonathan Jr., in July.
Moore had been non-committal about ever playing basketball again.
“Well, I think it’s time to put a close to the pro basketball life,” Moore said. “I walked away four seasons ago, but wanted to officially retire. This is such a sweet time for us and our family. The work we’ve done. I want to continue that in our next chapter. Be home for my community and family. … That’s what I’m moving into. Hanging it up.”
The 33-year-old Moore won four WNBA championships with the Minnesota Lynx, two Olympic gold medals with USA Basketball and two NCAA titles with UConn.
“On behalf of the Minnesota Lynx organization, I want to congratulate Maya on an incredible basketball career,” Lynx coach and President of Basketball Operations Cheryl Reeve said. “We will always cherish her time in a Lynx uniform and we wish her the best as she continues to pursue this next chapter of her life.”
Moore will be eligible for the Naismith Hall of Fame next year since she stopped playing four years ago.
Moore was one of the rare athletes to leave their sport in the prime of their career. She was drafted No. 1 by the Lynx in 2011 and averaged 18.4 points, 5.9 rebounds and 1.7 steals for the Lynx. She was the league’s MVP in 2014 as well as winning Rookie of the Year.
She finished her career as the Lynx franchise leader in scoring average, 3-point field goals made (530) and steals (449) and finished second in total points scored (4,984), field goals made (1,782), assists (896) and blocks (176).
“Maya Moore has forever left a mark on the state of Minnesota, the Minnesota Lynx franchise and the hearts of Lynx fans everywhere,” Minnesota Timberwolves and Lynx owner Glen Taylor said. “Maya’s accolades are numerous; her leadership and talent both fearless and inspirational set the foundation for the most exciting and historic championship run in the league from 2011-2017. While today culminates Maya’s basketball career, there is no doubt she will continue to impact the game we all love. We wish Maya all the best and will root for her always.”
Moore went 150-4 in her illustrious career at UConn. The two-time AP Player of the Year was a key part of the Huskies’ 90-game winning streak that was the longest-ever until the school had an 111-game run a few years later.

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